BOOK REVIEW: Delavier’s Women’s Strength Training Anatomy Workouts by Frédéric Delavier & Michael Gundill

I spotted Delavier’s Women’s Strength Training Anatomy Workouts, alongside Delavier’s Stretching Anatomy on Amazon.  My friend, Ellen, saw them on my Amazon Wishlist and got them for me to fuel my fitness fanaticism. Let’s be real – reading about getting fit is easier than doing it.  So, I really appreciated getting this book! Regrettably, I … Continue reading BOOK REVIEW: Delavier’s Women’s Strength Training Anatomy Workouts by Frédéric Delavier & Michael Gundill

Three exercises for noticing small emotions

If nothing else, I find this subject interesting & I’m re-blogging to keep it available to me in the future.

If it helps any of you all, I will take all the credit for sharing it, of course. 😉 (Many kudos to the real hero in that scenario – the author, for some great tips.)

Love Uncommon

Historically, I wasn’t very good at noticing emotions when they are small. In fact, for the longest time I really only noticed emotions when they became too overwhelming to ignore. This was not an effective strategy. It led to really painful interpersonal conflict and meant I spent a lot of time running away from emotional experiences. These days I’m much more able to identify and name emotions when they are low-level, which helps me to identify my needs and desires and to communicate these more effectively. Much of the credit for this goes to the work I have done in being mindful of my emotions. Here are three exercises that I’ve found helpful:

1. Noticing emotional neutrality

Throughout the day you will most likely have moments when you don’t think that you’re feeling much of anything. These moments are perfect for pausing to notice whether anything more complicated is going…

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Taking your emotional temperature

I love this idea – simply recognizing you’re having feelings can make them feel less intense. I’m definitely going to try this out!

Love Uncommon

So, I’ve been spending more and more time feeling into my emotions, and I’ve come to the conclusion that the way I was taught to understand emotions as a younger person was dangerously wrong. You see, I was taught that emotions could be understood on a scale from sad to happy (and that you should really always try to be happy). It looked something like this:

happysadI’m guessing you can already see some problems with this approach. My life is rarely binary, and my emotions are certainly not. I do not operate on a happy to sad scale. This approach didn’t give me a way to communicate or express other feelings, such as guilt, fear, overwhelm, anger or disgust. It also didn’t give me an easy way to communicate complex feelings, where I was having more than one emotion at a time. 

Despite the happy to sad scale not working…

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