WHY DO GUYS REFUSE TO SEE A DOCTOR?

Alright, let’s get this out of the way right quick – DISCLAIMER:  I based this post on my own, and other people’s, anecdotal experiences.  Even though it’s directed at men, it’s not just them refusing to get treatment (all you women – we see you too!).  I want to hear your thoughts if you’ve seen … Continue reading WHY DO GUYS REFUSE TO SEE A DOCTOR?

BOOK REVIEW: Delavier’s Women’s Strength Training Anatomy Workouts by Frédéric Delavier & Michael Gundill

I spotted Delavier’s Women’s Strength Training Anatomy Workouts, alongside Delavier’s Stretching Anatomy on Amazon.  My friend, Ellen, saw them on my Amazon Wishlist and got them for me to fuel my fitness fanaticism. Let’s be real – reading about getting fit is easier than doing it.  So, I really appreciated getting this book! Regrettably, I … Continue reading BOOK REVIEW: Delavier’s Women’s Strength Training Anatomy Workouts by Frédéric Delavier & Michael Gundill

Random Questions – Post #5

If you’re new to our “weird/random/oversharing” corner of the Internet, or, if you need a refresher, check out Random Questions – Post #1.  For the veterans, welcome home.  Make yourself comfortable!  Random Question #5 Who are you?  How do you define yourself?  Are you who you’re related to?  Your career?  Your interests?  Your quirks?  So… … Continue reading Random Questions – Post #5

Anti-Vax Lunacy

Filosofa's Word

I am as stubborn as they come, but I am fully vaccinated.  Why, you ask?  Because I believe that while I have every right to take chances with my own life, I have absolutely NO RIGHT to put others in danger.  It’s called ‘having a social conscience.’  It’s called ‘caring about others.’  It’s called ‘doing the right thing.’

I am appalled by those who have cited every excuse in the book for refusing to be vaccinated against COVID.  This pandemic has killed over 4 million people around the world … 623,029 in the United States, as of this writing, though by the time you are reading it, the number will be even higher.  And WE … You and I … have the key to stopping it in our hands.  If we fail to use that key, then we are complicit in those deaths.

The excuses are myriad and utterly without…

View original post 714 more words

3 reasons to pay attention to social comedowns in a pandemic changed world

This is so true. Having fibromyalgia, I already had some issues after social events (no matter how awesome they were). Talking about it is the first step – It’s more common than you’d think!

Love Uncommon

Many people experience a social hangover or comedown after spending time with friends. Some people know it as con-drop. Others just recognise that social interactions have the cost of a night of rumination and worry or a morning of scattered brain. These experiences are not widely discussed, which means that folks can feel really ashamed when they have a hard time after an otherwise pleasurable social event. I think this is a great moment to start talking more about social hangovers and come downs because they are very likely to get more common as more places come out of lock down and people start to socialise more. The shift from relatively few social interactions to a great deal more social contact, and particularly contact with larger groups of people, is likely to cause increases in social anxiety, higher levels of adrenaline and cortisol in our blood as we have social…

View original post 593 more words

Commentary #110: Fatphobia in the Medical System, and Thin Privilege

Don’t buy the hype. BMI doesn’t take muscle mass, which weighs more than fat, into account. Body-builders are often “obese” by BMI standards.

Hot Shot Headlines

I found this on Facebook on July 29, 2020. It was originally shared by Heatherina Lavender on May 25, 2018.

This was utterly shocking to me. I’m ashamed of how shocking it was.

No wonder Americans have issues with eating disorders!


The resounding comment I got when I shared this on my Facebook page/profile was about Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Many of my friends have it, but almost all of them were not properly or appropriately diagnosed for YEARS. And that is completely unacceptable.

I remember learning about PCOS in “Family Life.” I think The Care and Keeping of You, by American Girl, may have covered it? I can’t remember for sure. I also read Girlology multiple times through the library.

Here’s some more information about PCOS:

  • The ovaries produce an abnormal amount of androgens, male sex hormones that women typically have in small amounts.
  • Some women do not…

View original post 879 more words

Three exercises for noticing small emotions

If nothing else, I find this subject interesting & I’m re-blogging to keep it available to me in the future.

If it helps any of you all, I will take all the credit for sharing it, of course. 😉 (Many kudos to the real hero in that scenario – the author, for some great tips.)

Love Uncommon

Historically, I wasn’t very good at noticing emotions when they are small. In fact, for the longest time I really only noticed emotions when they became too overwhelming to ignore. This was not an effective strategy. It led to really painful interpersonal conflict and meant I spent a lot of time running away from emotional experiences. These days I’m much more able to identify and name emotions when they are low-level, which helps me to identify my needs and desires and to communicate these more effectively. Much of the credit for this goes to the work I have done in being mindful of my emotions. Here are three exercises that I’ve found helpful:

1. Noticing emotional neutrality

Throughout the day you will most likely have moments when you don’t think that you’re feeling much of anything. These moments are perfect for pausing to notice whether anything more complicated is going…

View original post 460 more words

Taking your emotional temperature

I love this idea – simply recognizing you’re having feelings can make them feel less intense. I’m definitely going to try this out!

Love Uncommon

So, I’ve been spending more and more time feeling into my emotions, and I’ve come to the conclusion that the way I was taught to understand emotions as a younger person was dangerously wrong. You see, I was taught that emotions could be understood on a scale from sad to happy (and that you should really always try to be happy). It looked something like this:

happysadI’m guessing you can already see some problems with this approach. My life is rarely binary, and my emotions are certainly not. I do not operate on a happy to sad scale. This approach didn’t give me a way to communicate or express other feelings, such as guilt, fear, overwhelm, anger or disgust. It also didn’t give me an easy way to communicate complex feelings, where I was having more than one emotion at a time. 

Despite the happy to sad scale not working…

View original post 458 more words