Does The Truth Change When An “Immoral” Woman Speaks It?

The Pamphleteer

To decide if a woman should be allowed to speak, we excavate her morality. If she says she was raped, we talk about her multiple sexual partners and how that makes her story implausible. When she says she was harassed, we talk about the fact that she drinks alcohol. When I spoke about the army, they asked how a “modern” bisexual woman could possibly be believed? But I ask, does the truth change when an “immoral” woman speaks it?

Written by Aarushi Ahluwalia.

A few years ago I wrote a series of pieces about abortions. While some of the pieces were about the laws and medical processes involved in choosing to undergo a medical or surgical termination of pregnancy, a few others were about my personal experience with abortion. I wrote the personal pieces because the doctor I had seen not only shamed me for my choices but refused to…

View original post 1,351 more words

BOOK REVIEW: Delavier’s Women’s Strength Training Anatomy Workouts by Frédéric Delavier & Michael Gundill

I spotted Delavier’s Women’s Strength Training Anatomy Workouts, alongside Delavier’s Stretching Anatomy on Amazon.  My friend, Ellen, saw them on my Amazon Wishlist and got them for me to fuel my fitness fanaticism. Let’s be real – reading about getting fit is easier than doing it.  So, I really appreciated getting this book! Regrettably, I … Continue reading BOOK REVIEW: Delavier’s Women’s Strength Training Anatomy Workouts by Frédéric Delavier & Michael Gundill

Random Questions – Post #5

If you’re new to our “weird/random/oversharing” corner of the Internet, or, if you need a refresher, check out Random Questions – Post #1.  For the veterans, welcome home.  Make yourself comfortable!  Random Question #5 Who are you?  How do you define yourself?  Are you who you’re related to?  Your career?  Your interests?  Your quirks?  So… … Continue reading Random Questions – Post #5

BOOK REVIEW: Hocus Pocus: Titania’s Book of Spells by Titania Hardie

I’m so glad I bought this book when I was a teenager.  I’d be so embarrassed if someone saw me buying it now. Not because I’m ashamed of the subject matter, mind you.  I’m still interested and, yes, even charmed (😉) by the practices of Wicca and paganism.  No, I’d be ashamed if I were … Continue reading BOOK REVIEW: Hocus Pocus: Titania’s Book of Spells by Titania Hardie

BOOK REVIEW: The Science Fiction Century ed, by David G. Hartwell

Hmm.  I can’t, for the life of me, remember how I got this book.  Clearly, it was well-read and well-loved before I got it.  It was missing its dust cover, and had some water damage, but it was readable. It’s possible I got The Science Fiction Century from the “Take a Book/Leave a Book” spot … Continue reading BOOK REVIEW: The Science Fiction Century ed, by David G. Hartwell

The State of New Jersey’s Recreational Pot Changes

(DISCLAIMER: This post is about the legal nonsense at work.  If you’re looking for a big bong party, keep on lookin’!  And then send me an invite. 😉 SECOND DISCLAIMER: I’m not a lawyer.  However, I am a little more familiar with the law than the average person.  (And, no, I don’t mean I’ve been … Continue reading The State of New Jersey’s Recreational Pot Changes

Cutting down History… or just a Monument?

Coalition of the Brave

Robert E Lee is a name that may not be familiar to everyone, but if you’re even dimly aware of the history of the US Civil War, it’s a name you will know. Lee served as a general for the Confederacy in the Civil War (indeed, he was the commander of Confederate forces), and he desired to preserve the Union yet joined Confederate forces in his home state of Virginia. He privately opposed the idea of secession from the Union yet fought to accomplish exactly that. He reportedly was against the idea of slavery, yet fought against the Union in part because of abolishment. Lee is documented as having re-captured slaves who escaped their owners, even overseeing their punishment (usually in the form of whipping).

Lee is a romanticised figure in America’s South. He’s seen as a hero who fought for freedom and rights, which is ironic when you consider…

View original post 221 more words